Cleaning Up After Another Financial Adviser's Bad Advice

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Average Americans have a poor opinion about financial advisers, and with good reason. Too many “advisers” are just salespeople for products that generate commissions for the adviser but rarely deliver the promised investment returns to the client.

As a financial adviser myself, I often see unsuitable investments in prospective clients' portfolios. I can't just badmouth those clients' current adviser. If I point out how this adviser has abused their trust, how are they going to trust me? What can I tell the prospect about another adviser's bad advice without dragging myself down to his or her level?

Recently I reviewed the investment statements of a prospect family who owned about $1 million in assets in joint taxable accounts and IRAs. The IRAs were invested primarily in variable annuities. The family had already shown me that their retirement income needs were covered by pensions. Their primary interest was in asset transfer to their children.

Read the entire article at Money.